Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

The articles that are marked with an asterisk(*) indicates that the content is no longer available online.

Title Source Date
After combat, soldiers turning to alcohol NBCNews.com August 12, 2008

CHICAGO - National Guard and Reserve combat troops in Iraq and Afghanistan are more likely to develop drinking problems than active-duty soldiers, a new military study suggests ...

Study Finds Scant Data on Illnesses of Troops New York Times 1 November 2011

Study findings indicate that there is insufficient data to conclude that dust and pollution in the war zones of Iraq and Afghanistan, particularly from the burn pits used by the military to incinerate garbage, could cause long-term health problems in troops.

A version of this article appeared in print on 1 November 2011, on page A17 of the New York edition with the headline: Study Finds Scant Data On Illnesses Of Troops.
A Postwar Picture of Resilience New York Times 5 February 2012

According to mounting scientific evidence, the prevalence of post-traumatic stress syndrome among veterans of recent wars is substantially lower than is commonly believed.

Deployment Factors Are Not Related to Rise in Military Suicides New York Times 6 Aug 2013

The record number of military suicides seen in recent years may not be directly due to extended deployments or combat experience, according to a new study. This data analysis, funded by the Department of Defense, suggests that the real reason behind the growing number of military suicides is underlying mental health issues in this population.

Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity News Medical 27 June 2016

Despite being held to stringent weight and body fat standards, newly published research shows that one in five individuals from a sample of U.S. military personnel from 2001 - 2008 have obesity. Further, shortly after separating from active duty, U.S. military veterans are as likely to have obesity as civilians. Data from the research also showed an association between military personnel who have obesity - including both active duty and veterans - and mental health conditions like depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The research led by Toni Rush, MPH, is published in the July issue of Obesity, the scientific journal of The Obesity Society.

Lifestyle Behaviors Key to Post-Deployment Health of Veterans Newswise 31 Oct 2013

A new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds that the lifestyle of veterans both pre- and post-deployment influences their post-deployment wellness.

PTSD May Be a Risk Factor for Autoimmune Disease Psychology Today 28 February 2020

People suffering from PTSD may be at increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases. These findings support a growing body of evidence showing a link between PTSD, stress, and physical health.

PTSD may raise diabetes risk in service members Reuters 24 May, 2010

Military service members with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are more likely to develop diabetes than their counterparts without PTSD symptoms, results of a new study hint. While previous research has suggested that depression increases the risk of diabetes, the new study of more than 44,000 active duty service members suggests another stronger association.

Also reported at MDLinx.com
Giving Birth after Battle: Increased Risk of Postpartum Depression for Women in Military Science & Sensibility 11 November 2013

Today, November 11th is Veteran's Day in the United States and Americans honor those who have served and continue to serve in the Armed Forces in order to protect our country. Today on Science & Sensibility, regular contributor Walker Karraa, PhD, takes a look at the impact serving in battle has on women who go on to birth. In an exclusive interview with expert Cynthia LeardMann, Walker shares with S&S readers what the study says and receives more indepth information that provides additional insight into just what women in the military face in regards to their increased risk of PPMADs.

Pre-Existing Insomnia Linked to PTSD and Other Mental Disorders After Military Deployment Science Daily 28 June 2013<

Pre-Existing Insomnia Linked to PTSD and Other Mental Disorders After Military Deployment Science Daily - 28 June 2013 The new study, published in the July 2013 issue of the journal SLEEP, found that pre-existing insomnia symptoms conferred almost as a large of a risk for those mental disorders as combat exposure.

The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense of non-U.S. Government sites or the information, products, or services contained therein. Although the Department of Defense may or may not use these sites as additional distribution channels for Department of Defense information, it does not exercise editorial control over all of the information that you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this website.