Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

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Title Source Date
Experts Debate Link Between Deployment And Suicide Risk Forbes.com 19 December 2013

There is a very interesting debate over combat deployment and suicide risk in the December 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.The conversation unfolds in the letters section, and it addresses the results of a JAMA study published in August that suggested military deployment is not associated with suicide risk.

Pentagon study links prescription stimulants to military PTSD risk Los Angeles Times 19 November 2015

Stimulant medications used to treat attention deficit problems and keep service members alert during long stretches of combat might increase vulnerability to post-traumatic stress disorder.

Also reported at:
(e) Science News
Poor Physical, Mental Health Status May Increase PTSD Risk Medscape 20 April 2009

Poor physical or mental health prior to combat exposure may predispose military personnel to an increased risk for new-onset posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after deployment, new research suggests ...

Trying to Get Rest For The Weary: Managing Sleep Disorders In Returning Servicemembers US Medicine 2011 April

Returning servicemembers are among the some 40 million Americans who suffer from chronic long term sleep disorders, and, for reasons ranging from disrupted sleep during deployment

Are you one of these 200,000 taking part in a military and veteran health study? DoD wants your input Military Times 21 November 2019

If you’re among the more than 200,000 service members and veterans participating in the long-term health study, researchers are calling on you to fill out a follow-up survey, as they track health risks of deployment, military occupations and general military service.

A Drug to Cure Fear The New York Times 22 January 2016

A study that will be published next month found that the escalating use of stimulants by the military in active duty soldiers, including those serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, was strongly correlated with an increase in the rates of PTSD, even when controlling for other factors, like the rate of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The study examined the use of prescription stimulants, like Ritalin and Adderall, and the rates of PTSD in nearly 26,000 military service members between 2001 and 2008, and found that the incidence of PTSD increased along with the prescriptions.

Millennium Cohort Study Expanding To Include Spouses of Service Members Force Health Protection and Readiness 22 March 2010

The Millennium Cohort Study, which was launched in 2001 to help address health outcomes related to Service members' deployments, will soon be increasing its enrollment to more than 200,000 participants. The next survey cycle, which begins this year, will add 50,000 new Cohort members plus 10,000 spouses of Service members to the study.

PTSD may raise diabetes risk in service members Reuters 24 May, 2010

Military service members with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are more likely to develop diabetes than their counterparts without PTSD symptoms, results of a new study hint. While previous research has suggested that depression increases the risk of diabetes, the new study of more than 44,000 active duty service members suggests another stronger association.

Also reported at MDLinx.com
Female Soldiers at No Greater Risk than Men for PTSD MSN 25 August 2015

A new study by the Department of Veterans Affairs found there is no difference in the chances of developing post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, between males and females who have similar experiences, combat included.As a result of carefully looking at veterans' medical histories and life experiences, researchers said the number of PTSD cases among veterans caused specifically by service in Iraq and Afghanistan may be lower than thought.

After combat, do military moms get more depressed than women without kids? Washington Post 25 January 2013

"Women who deploy and report combat-associated exposures after childbirth are significantly more likely to screen positive for maternal depression than are women who did not deploy after childbirth," concluded the study, titled "Is Military Deployment a Risk Factor for Maternal Depression?" and appearing in the Journal of Women's Health.

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