Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

The articles that are marked with an asterisk(*) indicates that the content is no longer available online.

Title Source Date
Combat Deployment Just One Factor That May Cause Smoking U.S. News & World Report 16 April 2015

Combat experience is one of the factors that increases the risk that U.S. soldiers will start smoking, a new study suggests.Researchers analyzed data from a long-term study to assess the long-term health effects of service in the U.S. military. The study began in 2001 and will continue until 2022. The researchers collect survey data every three years.The focus of this study was military personnel who had never smoked or had quit smoking. The researchers wanted to tease out possible factors for either starting or resuming smoking.They found that factors linked to resuming or newly starting a smoking habit included pay grade, service branch, combat deployment, mental health history, stress and individual characteristics.

Study Endorsed by Army's Top Doc Navy.mil 1 October 2014

The Department of Defense's largest longitudinal study in military history received an endorsement from the Army's surgeon general Sept. 19, emphasizing the importance of the Navy-led study across the military services.

Military suicide associated with male gender, mental illness and occupation Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly 30 April 2014

Analysis of factors associated with death by suicide during and after military service found that suicide was most common among those with bipolar disorder, depression and alcohol-related problems. Additionally, death by suicide was associated with fewer cumulative days of deployment, the occupation of combat specialist, deployment experience pre-2001 and male gender. Overall, 12.8% of the deaths in the current sample were due to suicide.

Insomnia and poor sleep duration pre-deployment are associated with development of PTSD, anxiety and depression after first deployment Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly 30 April 2014

Among service members with no history of mental disorder diagnosis or psychotropic medication prescription, and who screened negative for depression, anxiety, PTSD and panic pre-deployment, 3.4% developed PTSD, less than 1% developed anxiety and less than 2% developed depression after first deployment. Service members who reported sleeping fewer than six hours per night pre-deployment were significantly more likely to develop PTSD than those sleeping seven hours per night. Additionally, those reporting insomnia symptoms pre-deployment were at higher risk for new-onset PTSD, anxiety and depression.

Experts Debate Link Between Deployment And Suicide Risk Forbes.com 19 December 2013

There is a very interesting debate over combat deployment and suicide risk in the December 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.The conversation unfolds in the letters section, and it addresses the results of a JAMA study published in August that suggested military deployment is not associated with suicide risk.

Giving Birth after Battle: Increased Risk of Postpartum Depression for Women in Military Science & Sensibility 11 November 2013

Today, November 11th is Veteran's Day in the United States and Americans honor those who have served and continue to serve in the Armed Forces in order to protect our country. Today on Science & Sensibility, regular contributor Walker Karraa, PhD, takes a look at the impact serving in battle has on women who go on to birth. In an exclusive interview with expert Cynthia LeardMann, Walker shares with S&S readers what the study says and receives more indepth information that provides additional insight into just what women in the military face in regards to their increased risk of PPMADs.

Lifestyle Behaviors Key to Post-Deployment Health of Veterans Newswise 31 Oct 2013

A new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds that the lifestyle of veterans both pre- and post-deployment influences their post-deployment wellness.

Recruiting for Mental Resilience Needs to be a Priority UT San Diego 27 Oct 2013

Today's all-volunteer force is arguably one of the most highly trained and highly educated in our nation's history. To maintain that edge, it must have a strong recruiting pipeline, one that seeks out physically fit, smart young men and women who are interested in serving their country and gaining valuable skills for subsequent careers outside the military. Why, then, don't they recruit for mental health and resiliency?

Sexual harassment, assault more likely for deployed women who saw 'combat' Stars and Stripes 30 Sept 2013

Deployed women who underwent "combat-like" experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan are much more likely to report sexual harassment and sexual assault compared with other deployed women, according to a new study.

Also reported at:
Military.com, UPI, MDLinx, Medscape (* log-in required)
Deployment Factors Are Not Related to Rise in Military Suicides New York Times 6 Aug 2013

The record number of military suicides seen in recent years may not be directly due to extended deployments or combat experience, according to a new study. This data analysis, funded by the Department of Defense, suggests that the real reason behind the growing number of military suicides is underlying mental health issues in this population.

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