Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

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Title Source Date
Respiratory Conditions Investigated for the Deployed US DoD Military Health System 10 February 2010

A recent study published by DoD researchers in the American Journal of Epidemiology reports that service members who deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan are at no increased risk for developing chronic respiratory conditions.

Naval Health Research Center: Behavioral Science and Epidemiology Navy Medicine Magazine Jan - Feb 2010

Study Links Deployment to Hypertension Health.mil 15 December 2009

DoD medical researchers have found that service members who suffered multiple combat exposures during a deployment, and especially those who had witnessed death as a result of war, were much more likely to report hypertension (chronic high blood pressure) compared to those who had not seen combat.

Respiratory Symptoms and Conditions Reported Among Military Personnel Deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan MHS Vital Signs 9 December 2009

A study recently published by researchers at the Naval Health Research Center addresses concerns about respiratory conditions among persons deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.

Iraq/Afghanistan deployment tied to respiratory woes Global News 3 December 2009

U.S. military personnel deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan face an increased risk for developing respiratory symptoms, including persistent or recurring cough and shortness of breath, a large-scale military study has shown.

Study Team Sets Out to Identify Health Trends in Service Members US Department of Defense Military Health System 26 October 2009

The Department of Defense's ongoing Millennium Cohort Study of 150,000 members of the military and veterans has helped researchers learn important new information about many deployment health-related concerns, according to the leader of the study.

Combat Exposure Tied to Chronic High Blood Pressure MedPage Today 14 September 2009

U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan who go into combat are more likely to develop high blood pressure over the long term than those who serve in supporting roles, a new military study finds.

Also reported at RedOrbit.com
Also reported at PHYSORG.com
Forty Percent of Military Population Uses Alternative Therapies US Department of Defense Military Health System 11 August 2009

The Naval Health Research Center recently published an article in the Annals of Epidemiology on the use of complementary and alternative medicine in the military population. The article found that approximately forty percent of the U.S. military population uses alternative therapies.

Story shared in the Health Information Operations Weekly Update Newsletter by the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine dated 21 August 2009.
Deployed service members have higher risks for smoking, heavy drinking, and PTSD Federal Health Institute Newsletter 29 May 2009

A recent study on the long-term health effects of thousands of service members found that deployed service members who are exposed to combat have increased risks for smoking, heavy drinking and PTSD symptoms

Poor Physical, Mental Health Status May Increase PTSD Risk Medscape 20 April 2009

Poor physical or mental health prior to combat exposure may predispose military personnel to an increased risk for new-onset posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after deployment, new research suggests ...

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